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Ben Byrnes

Benjamin is a student of Colorado College in Colorado Springs, CO and is majoring in Studio Art. He plans to enroll in the Masters in the Arts of Teaching program at Colorado College after graduating. He currently helps teach art at Taylor Elementary while also mentoring at Tessla Middle School both of which are in Colorado Springs. Ben plans on bringing the work back to Colorado to help raise awareness of the plight of AIDS orphans in Mozambique.


comments from website visitors:

Dominic and I were looking at this site tonight and were in awe of the experiences you and the children had with this project. I can only imagine this was a life changing experience for all of you.
Auntie Kathy Byrnes
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Posted Friday, October 17, 2008 8:27PM

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New threads
Tomas Cumbana

Double up
Joanne Kim

Rumble seat recipes
Eugene Ahn

textstream

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Hello Wednesday, August 8

Ben Byrnes

Posted 10:14PM on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Pacific Time

It is amazing that in three days time these kids have been able to progress from being shy and almost awestruck around the cameras to analyzing each situation for composition, lighting and angles to produce dramatic photography. The intensely personal vision of the kids when they photograph their friends, neighborhood, and yesterday, their homes, offers an amazing insight to how they view their world. They have begun to realize that with the lens of a camera they can share their stories and there are people both in Mozambique and thousands of miles away who will care.

While conversing with my father through email he was reminded of "a speech by Bill Moyer this last January. In the speech [Bill] reminded us that the successes of the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War Protests were because the stories of man's inhumanity to man were told over and over again, especially through graphic photography, until it finally seeped into the American consciousness. This process took many years, even decades of perseverance by the story tellers. They opened our eyes and we owe them a great deal of gratitude." My hope is that when all is said and done and the book has been published and shows have been set up, the stories will keep being retold by those who listen.


Ready to teach

Ben Byrnes

Posted 1:11AM on Saturday, July 28, 2007 Pacific Time

When I first heard about the trip to Mozambique I was both excited and intrigued. Going to Mozambique is a great opportunity to expand on my experiences surrounding both teaching and photography. I am a student at Colorado College majoring in studio art and education and hope to become an art teacher after I graduate. For the past year I have been working with students in Colorado who are considered at-risk for dropping out of school and dangerous behavior. I am also working on my own art work including both photography and sculpture. I am really excited to meet the kids whom I will be working with. It will be interesting comparing and contrasting my teaching experiences in Colorado and Maputo. I'm packing frantically and am looking forward to meeting everyone on the trip."



 

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When my parents died some neighbors and family abandoned us, although some are still supportive, but it is different than before. Now, my family will say hello in the street, but they will not come into our home. I asked my Uncle, why doesn’t anyone visit us? Why won’t people visit?
Inocencia
Maputo project participant


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